Recruitment for On-Going Research Studies

Recruitment for On-Going Research Studies at Korey Stringer Institute

AMPlify Hydration

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

A paid research study is being conducted by the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut to investigate the influence of a commercially available sodium bicarbonate lotion (AMP Human PR Lotion; https://amphuman.com/) and its impact on hydration after water ingestion while resting in the heat. We are seeking recreationally active males (≥3 days week and ≥30 minutes duration per exercise session) who are 18-35 years old and may be interested in participation.

Data collection will consist of 8 total visits to the laboratory:

  • Baseline Hydration Assessments
    • Visits 1-3 & 5-7:
      • Morning urine sample, 24-hour urine collection, height, weight, dietary and thirst surveys, blood pressure, and blood draws will be completed.
    • Data collection trial
      • Visits 4 & 8:
        • Application of sodium lotion or placebo product followed by sitting passively in the heated environmental chamber while collection of urine, blood, and cognitive assessments are conducted.
  • Data collection is divided into the completion of 2 phases (visits 1-4 & 5-8) which must be separated by a minimum of 3 days. Participants will be randomly assigned to either the sodium bicarbonate or placebo lotion in each phase.
  • The baseline Hydration Assessment visits will take ~30 minutes for completion of each visit.
  • The data collection trials in the environmental/climatic chamber (visits 4 & 8) will take ~7 hours for completion.

Subjects will be compensated on a prorated basis dependent upon the amount of study visits completed. Full compensation will be provided to those who complete all 8 study visits.

Participants will be expected to complete approximately ~17 hours of data collection over the 8 days of visits. This study was approved by UConn IRB, Protocol #H20-100 under the advisement of Principal Investigator Dr. Douglas Casa.