Month: May 2016

Upcoming Scientific Presentations

By Sarah Attanasio, Assistant Director of Research

Upcoming Presentations

Come visit and engage with the KSI staff members at the upcoming annual NATA and ACSM Conferences. Find out which members are presenting, where and about what can you expect to learn from each presentation below.

 

The American College of Sports Medicine 63rd Annual Meeting- May 31- June 4th 2016- Boston MA

 

William Adams, PhD, ATC– Thematic Poster

“Thirst as a Marker of Hydration Status During and After Exercise in the Heat”

Date: Wednesday, 6/1; 1:00-3:00pm

 

Yuri Hosokawa, MAT, ATC– Poster Presentation

“Assessing Warm Weather Race Preparedness Using the Heat Stress Score”

Date: Thursday, 6/2; 2-3:30pm

 

Lesley Vandermark, PhD, ATC, EMT, PES– Poster Presentation

“Beverage Content Influences Voluntary Fluid Intake During Exercise: A Systematic Review”

Date: Thursday, 6/2; 2-3:30pm

 

Douglas Casa, PhD, ATC, FACSM, FNATA– President’s Lecture

“Preventing Sudden Death in Sports and Physical Activity: The Struggles (and Successes) to Implement Evidence into Clinical Practice”

Date: Thursday, 6/2; 10:30- 11:20am

 

Douglas Casa, PhD, ATC, FACSM, FNATA– Symposium

“Preventing, Recognizing, and Treating Exertional Heat Stroke at Endurance Events”

Date: Thursday, 6/2; 9:20-9:45am

 

Samantha Scarneo, MS, ATC– Free Communication/Slide

“Lower Extremity Injury Risk in Youth Female Basketball Athletes with and without a History of Concussion”

Date: Friday, 6/3; 1:00-3:00pm

 

The National Athletic Trainers’ Association 67th Clinical Symposia and Expo- June 22-25th 2016- Baltimore MD

 

William Adams,  PhD, ATC– Minicourse

“Developing and Implementing Evidence-Based Best Practice and Procedure for the Prevention of Sudden Death in Sport”

Date: Wednesday 6/22; 5:15-6:15pm

 

Lesley Vandermark, PhD, ATC, EMT, PES– Free Communication Oral Presentation

“Investigation of Provisional Medical Care in the Public Secondary School Setting”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 9:15-10:15am

 

Rachel Vanscoy, MS, ATC– Poster Presentation

“Does The Shortened Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire Accurately Represent Physiological Adaptations Following a 10 Day Heat Acclimation Protocol?”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 11:15-12:00pm

 

Rachel Katch, MS, ATC– Poster Presentation

“Use of the Heat Stress Score to Predict Preparedness to Run in an Outdoor, Warm Weather Race”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 11:30-1:15pm

 

William Adams, PhD, ATC– Poster Presentation

“Policy Changes Reduce Exertional Sickling Related Deaths in Division I Collegiate Football Players”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 11:30-1:15pm

 

Yuri Hosokawa, MAT, ATC– Poster Presentation

“Tarp-Assisted Cooling is an Effective Method of Whole Body Cooling in Hyperthermic Individuals”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 11:30-1:15pm

 

Luke Belval, MS, ATC, CSCS– Poster Presentation

“Efficacy of a Novel Cooling Vest Following Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 11:30-1:15pm

 

Sarah Attanasio, BS– Poster Presentation

“Occurrence of Exertional Heat Stroke in High School Football Athletes Before and After Implementation of Evidence-Based Heat Acclimatization Guidelines”

Date: Thursday 6/23; 11:30-1:15pm

 

Yuri Hosokawa, MAT, ATC– Feature Presentation

“Malignant Hyperthermia in Physically Active Populations”

Date: Thursday, 6/23; 1:30- 3:30pm

 

Alicia Pike, MS, ATC– Oral presentation

“Private Secondary Schools Use Various Individuals When Providing Medical Coverage”

Date: Friday, 6/24; 10-10:15am

 

Rebecca Stearns PhD, ATC– Special Topic

“Protein’s Effectiveness As An Ingredient in Hydration Beverages”

Date: Saturday 6/25; 10:45-11:45am

 

 

5th Annual Korey Stringer Institute Gala and Fundraiser

By Alicia Pike, Assistant Director of Youth Sport Safety

KSI Gala 2016

The 5th Annual Korey Stringer Institute Gala and Fundraiser was held this past Thursday evening, May 5th, at the NFL Headquarters. Every year we are in awe of the immense support received from colleagues, friends, and family, and this year’s Gala was no exception. The night started by greeting guests and catching up with those who traveled near and far to attend the event, but this was not just a night for socializing. After welcoming remarks from Jeff Miller, Senior Vice President of Health and Safety Policy for the NFL, guests got to hear from James Gould, Chairman of the advisory board for the Korey Stringer Institute, Jeff Seemann, Vice President for Research at the University of Connecticut, and Kelci Stringer, Founder and Spokesperson of KSI. All emphasized the impact that KSI has had on spreading knowledge and advocacy to prevent sudden death in athletes, soldiers, and laborers both locally and nationally.

We are able to achieve this mission through the immense support of passionate, motivated people, especially our corporate partners, many of whom were in attendance. It was an exciting night for the KSI staff, as two announcements were made that will undoubtedly maximize the potential for research opportunities and more. Josh Shaw, Founder and CEO of Mission Athletecare, proudly announced the building of a state of the art heat chamber and performance lab on UConn’s campus. To add to the exciting news, Scott Sailor, President of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), announced an established partnership between the NATA and KSI, which will result in collaborative research efforts and opportunities.

This was also a night of recognition. Every year, KSI acknowledges three leaders in the realms of research, service, and education who have had a significant impact on health and safety for athletes and the physically active.  The 2016 KSI Lifesaving Research Award was awarded to Frederick Mueller, former Director of the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research. Through his research, he reduced the number of football fatalities and catastrophic injuries in high school and college sports. Rachael Oats, Associate Executive Director of the NATA, received the 2016 KSI Lifesaving Service Award. In addition to being a key advocate for KSI, Rachael has been involved in a vast number of projects and meetings, served on countless committees, and has volunteered hours of her time to advance health and safety initiatives and promote the prevention of sudden death in sport and physical activity. The final award, KSI Lifesaving Education Award, was presented to Lawrence Armstrong, distinguished professor in the Department of Kinesiology at UConn and President of the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. Armstrong has dedicated years to teaching and research, primarily focused on the effects of dehydration on cognitive functioning and exercise performance, as well as factors impacting thermoregulation and physiological strain.

It was another unforgettable night spent with colleagues, friends, and family who all share and support the same passion for preventing sudden death in the physically active. To those who traveled to attend, some traveling across the country to show support, we cannot thank you enough. It is your continued encouragement, advocacy and support that allow KSI to grow, thrive and save lives.

 

 

 

 

Philips AED Rebate Offer

Have you recently purchased HeartStart FRx and OnSite AEDs from Philips? They are offering a rebate program for these units that were purchased between April 15, 2016 and October 15, 2016 from a Philips authorized distributor.

 

For more information, please contact Jeff Petak (jeff@onebeatcpr.com).

Pre-College Summer at UConn

By Rachel Katch, Assistant Director of Military and Occupational Safety

Pre College Summer

The Pre-College Summer at UConn program is a rigorous academic opportunity offering rising high school juniors and seniors (class of 2017 or 2018) the chance to study and live on a top-ranked public university campus. Students are immersed in challenging and intensive one-week sessions in an academic area of their choice, choosing from a multitude of topic areas. The Korey Stringer Institute is proud to announce that we will be offering four sessions of our first ever Pre-College Summer Sports Medicine course.

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 3.53.51 PM

 

Our one-week (17.5 hour) programming features a curriculum of evidence-based prevention, recognition, and treatment of the nation’s leading emergency issues in sports, military, and occupational settings. Each session includes interactive presentations disseminated by the experienced staff of the Korey Stringer Institute, as well as hands on learning labs simulating the emergency treatment of life threatening aliments. A broad range of emergent topics will be covered during the sessions including:

  • Cardiovascular events
  • Exertional heat illnesses
  • Concussions
  • Traumatic injuries
  • Other significant contributors to sudden death

Despite recent and proposed rule and policy changes at all levels of activity (e.g., NFL, USA Youth Soccer, NCAA, etc.), including the now punishable act of head-to-head contact during tackling in football and the removal of heading in youth soccer, sudden death due to the above conditions can still be an inherent aspect of sport and physical activity. Participants can expect to learn imperative knowledge in the understanding of today’s leading causes of death in sport and physical activity, including essential firsthand skills in the prevention, recognition, and treatment of these emergent injuries and illnesses.

 

To register for our course, as well as find additional parent information regarding cost, accommodations, scheduling, etc., please visit the Pre-College Summer at UConn Sports Medicine website:

http://precollege-summer.uconn.edu/academic-areas/sport-medicine/

 

For any additional questions regarding the course’s curriculum, or the activities of the Korey Stringer Institute, please contact Rachel Katch at rachel.katch@uconn.edu. We look forward to seeing you in the summer!

 

 

Anthony Alessi: Wearable technology aiding athletes (The Bulletin)

Wearable technology has already made its way into almost everyone’s life to some degree. Interestingly, Major League Baseball now allows the use of these technologies to track players’ performance. Using the data provided by these new devices has a lot of implications.

Smartphones can now track how far and how quickly a person can walk. The Fitbit, Apple watch, Nike Fuelband and other devices can collect and analyze more data about the wearer’s physiology and sleep habits.

In the case of competitive sports, wearable technology can give an athlete a big advantage in regard to training habits and injury prevention.

Two devices approved by MLB for use during games this season look at different activities. One device is a sleeve that measures stress on elbows. This is specifically designed to collect data that will hopefully decrease the number of Tommy John surgeries that seem to be growing rapidly. The information can help create better coaching techniques and improved arm mechanics at all levels of play.

The other piece of approved wearable technology is a bioharness that monitors heart rate and breathing patterns in real time. These basic physiologic measures can help athletes gain necessary feedback to reach peak performance in stressful conditions.

One area of interest is the field of hydration and electrolyte balance. Specifically, the ability to monitor these parameters and avoid sudden death has become a goal of many scientists.

“The wearable technology industry related to the assessment of hydration status, sweat composition and body temperature has exploded in the past few years,” reports Dr. Douglas Casa, Professor of Kinesiology and CEO of the Korey Stringer Institute at UConn. “As of now, we still do not have a valid wearable sensor that can reveal real-time hydration status or provide an accurate estimate of core body temperature. I predict this will change within the next five years and will be of great value to the equipment-laden soldier, laborer or athlete who could benefit from this information while training, competing or working.”

Although many athletes are concerned with the privacy of physiologic data, their concern may be offset by the lifesaving ability this technology can provide.

Source: The Bulletin